Friday, July 11, 2008

This might be my favorite mount, ever:



This is Brontotherium (I'm not entirely sure which species...) at the Peabody Museum in New Haven, Connecticut. Doesn't the mount just ooze raw power? There's so much movement conveyed with such a fixed, inanimate object.

I wish I had mad Photoshop skillz so I could take out the glare and all that. Really, I wish I had Photoshop, period.

For some reason, I remember the display saying that the animal was in fact Brontops, though I could be wrong. I'm not 100% sure it's Brontotherium, but if EvoWiki is correct, the "slingshot-shaped" horns strongly suggest that it is.

5 comments:

Laelaps said...

As far as I'm aware the "thunder beasts" (much like the Dinocerata) are in major need of a revision. Why they've been overlooked for so long, I don't know, but it's disconcerting that when I search for information on them most of the papers that come up are Cope/Marsh memoirs with little new material.

I think you've got a Brontops there, which was related to Brontotherium (both of them had those "slingshot" horns in the front). Hopefully someone will get around to reorganizing the group they belong to, though.

Pleasance said...

Good post.

Traumador said...

i should have commented on this way back when you put it up, as it is one of your posts that has stuck with me. the reason i have thought of it recently is the new boneyard is about "my favourite museum" for which this would be a perfect post.

i was just wondering if you could give a shout out to people about this boneyard, as i'm hoping we can get lots of boneyard READERS doing some posts on this non scientific topic. that and another post on this museum or a different would be awesome!

info is at this link (feel free to nab the boneyard logo i've done for the theme):

http://traumador.blogspot.com/2008/11/boneyard-26-is-coming-here.html

thanks

ps- am i the only one having technical difficulties on your site, or have other ppl been having trouble on it too?

Neil said...

Both Brontops and Brontotherium have recently been sunk into Megacerops: Mihlbachler, Matthew C. (2008) "Species taxonmy, phylogeny, and biogeogeography of the brontotheriidae" Bulletin of the AMNH 311.

Dinorider d'Andoandor said...

flickr.com offers help on photo edition and there are some sites around there that may help u if you're interested